After A Thousand Years These Greek Sinkholes Have Become Unbelievably Beautiful

Sinkholes at Didyma 

A few kilometers from the picturesque village of Didyma in Ermionida is a rare geological phenomenon—two strange and imposing craters created by natural processes of erosion, forming large sinkholes or "dolines."

 Overhead view of the smaller sinkhole, containing two tiny byzantine churches built under the cliff at the bottom. – © Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports/Ephorate of Antiquities of Argolida

Overhead view of the smaller sinkhole, containing two tiny byzantine churches built under the cliff at the bottom. – © Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports/Ephorate of Antiquities of Argolida

The large doline forms a natural amphitheater, which was inhabited since the prehistoric age, as evidenced by the stone tools that the excavation brought to light. The smaller doline presents a great interest due to the numerous erosions marked on the ground. Two small byzantine churches are built under the cliff, surrounded by an abundance of wild vegetation; the church of Saint George with its 13th century murals and the church of Jesus Transfiguration.

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This video gives you a drone’s-eye view of these gigantic sinkholes so you can explore them for yourself. There are two major dolines in the village of Didyma: Megali and Mikri spilia, or “Big Cave” and “Small Cave,” respectively.

Sinkholes can be formed in all kinds of different ways and are found all over the globe. But these look absolutely amazing, and with this brand new aerial footage everyone can enjoy their beauty!

Enjoy the video!