The death penalty in ancient Greece: How did ancient Greeks execute people?

Capital punishment in Ancient Greece was common but was the last resort after many other punishments. 

Skeletal remains, with iron shackles on their wrists, are laid in a row at the ancient Falyron Delta cemetery in Athens  Credit: Reuters

Skeletal remains, with iron shackles on their wrists, are laid in a row at the ancient Falyron Delta cemetery in Athens Credit: Reuters

Athenians imposed fines, imprisonment, public humiliation in the stocks, limited loss of political rights, disfranchisement, exile and then death.

These could be amplified with the confiscation of property and/or the razing of the convict's house and/or a refusal of burial).

Foreigners experienced the same punishments, except for disenfranchisement. 

Slaves breaking the law were executed and their masters fined. 

They were relatively lenient when compared to other ancient civilisations. 

Socrates' execution via hemlock was similar to the modern-day lethal injection.  

Standard means of execution was bloodless crucifixion in which the convict was fastened to a board with iron collars around wrists, ankles, and neck.

The collar around the neck was tightened to strangle the wrongdoer.

Athenians were willing to let people destined for execution to take hemlock if they covered the cost of the poison. 

Generals on the battlefield had the authority to execute citizens and this they did with a swift blow of the sword. 

The society also allowed people to enter into exile even if being sentenced to death or awaiting execution.